Song Thrush

Song Thrush

This is one of the most familiar and popular British birds, for any great variety of reasons. In the to begin with it is a frequenter of gardens, where its comparatively large size and speckled breast allow it to be easily recognisable; there plus it indulges in spectacular feeding-behaviour which at the same time sets it apart like a special bird, because of its use of an anvil-stone where to smash snails is definitely an almost unique illustration of regular tool-using with a native bird, only equalled by the vice-using nuthatch; but most importantly it is the earliest true songster of the year, as well as sings inside a fairly regular pattern that words might be fitted.

Before Browning immortalised its practice of singing each song twice over, well-established word-versions you start with twice-repeated phrases for example 'Pretty Dick, pretty Dick' had already noted this typical habit. An additional attraction is the plaster-lined nest which can't be mistaken for your of any other bird, and the invariable and delightful eggs so it holds.
This really is one of the most familiar and popular British birds, for any great variety of
reasons. In the to begin with it is a frequenter of gardens, where its comparatively large size and speckled breast allow it to be easily recognisable; there plus it indulges in spectacular feeding-behaviour which at the same time sets it apart like a special bird, because of its use of an anvil-stone where to smash snails is definitely an almost unique illustration of regular tool-using with a native bird, only equalled by the vice-using nuthatch; but most importantly it is the earliest true songster of the year, as well as sings inside a fairly regular pattern that words might be fitted.

Before Browning immortalised its practice of singing each song twice over, well-established word-versions you start with twice-repeated phrases for example 'Pretty Dick, pretty Dick' had already noted this typical habit. An additional attraction is the plaster-lined nest which can't be mistaken for your of any other bird, and the invariable and delightful eggs so it holds.

Although nearly as fond of fruit as the blackbird, it's never regarded as not a desirable bird in the garden, safeguarded by its proven worth like a seeker-out and destroyer of snails. It's also useful in the garden inside a less obvious way, for strange as it might seem for any bird of its size, it'll gather aphids from infested fruit-trees or roses.

In contrast to the other common person in the thrush family, the blackbird, the song thrush is less adaptable to find food in difficult winters, and frequency its numbers are much reduced carrying out a prolonged hard spell. A particular proportion in our native birds avoid this threat by autumn movement to the milder south-west, not infrequently crossing the channel to France, particularly Brittany.
Although nearly as fond of fruit as the blackbird, it's never regarded as not a desirable bird in the garden, safeguarded by its proven worth like a seeker-out and destroyer of snails. It's also useful in the garden inside a less obvious way, for strange as it might seem for any bird of its size, it'll gather aphids from infested fruit-trees or roses.

In contrast to the other common person in the thrush family, the blackbird, the song thrush is less adaptable to find food in difficult winters, and frequency its numbers are much reduced carrying out a prolonged hard spell. A particular proportion in our native birds avoid this threat by autumn movement to the milder south-west, not infrequently crossing the channel to France, particularly Brittany.

Bird Details
Haunts: 

Open woodland with undergrowth, hedges, bushy commons, scrub, parks and gardens.

Appearance: 

Smaller size, browner back, warm buff background to speckled breast, orange-buff underwing, and insufficient whitish outer tail-feathers, all distinguish from mistle thrush; redwing most alike in dimensions and general coloration, but latter has prominent pale eye-stripe, reddish flush on flanks, and redder underwing-latter also more sociable.

Voice: 

Usually delivered from perch at the top of tree or building; clear and musical, but without fluting quality of blackbird; usually in a nutshell phrases of three or four notes, repeated three or four times, interspersed with longer notes, also usually repeated several times before continuing with faster notes. Call a faint 'sip'.

Food: 

Snails and earthworms chief diet from ground, also insect larvae from both ground and foliage. Wide selection of fruit and berries eaten.

Nesting: 

Usually at no great height in bush or hedge; nest of dead grass and root-fibres, or moss, compacted with damp earth, but unique feature is lining cup of cardboard-like plaster produced from rotten wood, dung and saliva; 4-5 eggs, slightly greener than sky-blue, spotted with black.